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Tuberculosis And 'Failure' : Who Should Bear The Label?
6 April 2017, 384 view.

Graciella* waited until she left the clinic before dissolving into tears. “I don’t understand how this happened,” she weeps, “I just don’t understand it.” Graciella had gone to the health center early that morning—skipping a day of work that she could ill-afford—with a kernel of hope in her heart.  After all, she had spent the last 12 months putting up the fight of her life.  When her husband Hector died coughing blood in the hospital, Graciella thought her tears would never dry. TB is so common in the slum where she lives, that when she herself was diagnosed with what her neighbors called “strong TB” (to her face, at least; behind her back, they whispered “killer TB”), she was too numb to cry.  But after  a little more than a year of taking a daily, painful injection and swallowing more than 17 tablets—some of which made her vomit, turned her skin dark orange, and left her with convulsions that required her to take even more medicine—Graciella had faith she was due for some good news. Thus she was completely unprepared for the shock that washed over her when her doctor announced that Graciella had “failed” treatment. That drug-resistant tuberculosis was still ravaging her body (that the neighbors might have been right when they murmured about “killer TB”).  In spite of all she had invested to be rid of this dreadful disease, there it was, marked on her treatment card with a big black X for all to see: Graciella Llaro, FAILED TREATMENT.         

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ALL ABOUT MDR TB
Tuberculosis And 'Failure' : Who Should Bear The Label?
6 April 2017 | Views 384

Graciella* waited until she left the clinic before dissolving into tears. “I don’t understand how this happened,” she weeps, “I just don’t understand it.” Graciella had gone to the health center early that morning—skipping a day of work that she could ill-afford—with a kernel of hope in her heart.  After all, she had spent the last 12 months putting up the fight of her life.  When her husband Hector died coughing blood in the hospital, Graciella thought her tears would never dry. TB is so common in the slum where she lives, that when she herself was diagnosed with what her neighbors called “strong TB” (to her face, at least; behind her back, they whispered “killer TB”), she was too numb to cry.  But after  a little more than a year of taking a daily, painful injection and swallowing more than 17 tablets—some of which made her vomit, turned her skin dark orange, and left her with convulsions that required her to take even more medicine—Graciella had faith she was due for some good news. Thus she was completely unprepared for the shock that washed over her when her doctor announced that Graciella had “failed” treatment. That drug-resistant tuberculosis was still ravaging her body (that the neighbors might have been right when they murmured about “killer TB”).  In spite of all she had invested to be rid of this dreadful disease, there it was, marked on her treatment card with a big black X for all to see: Graciella Llaro, FAILED TREATMENT.         

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World TB Day 2017: Lights, Camera, Action!
17 March 2017 | Views 653

The Stop TB Partnership launched its World TB Day website which has the full spectrum of downloadable communications materials. 

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WHO report warns global actions and investments to end tuberculosis epidemic are falling far short
17 October 2016 | Views 527

New data published by WHO in its 2016 "Global Tuberculosis Report" show that countries need to move much faster to prevent, detect, and treat the disease if they are to meet global targets.

Governments have agreed on targets to end the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic both at the World Health Assembly and at the United Nations General Assembly within the context of the Sustainable Development Goals. They include a 90% reduction in TB deaths and an 80% reduction in TB cases by 2030 compared with 2015.

"We face an uphill battle to reach the global targets for tuberculosis," said Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director General. "There must be a massive scale-up of efforts, or countries will continue to run behind this deadly epidemic and these ambitious goals will be missed."

The WHO 2016 "Global Tuberculosis Report" highlights the considerable inequalities among countries in enabling people with TB to access existing cost-effective diagnosis and treatment interventions that can accelerate the rate of decline in TB worldwide. The report also signals the need for bold political commitment and increased funding.

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